IPN-Like Technology

Technology on the Move

HYALURONIC ACID, A “MOLECULE TO MOISTURIZE”1

All VIVACY’s products are hyaluronic acid-based (HA). Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring molecule in the human body, particularly in the skin and mucous membranes. It has the specific feature of retaining up to 1,000 times its weight in water2 contributing to the hydration and the tone of the concerned tissues3.

Hyaluronic acid has a short half-life and is soluble in water, so it needs to be stabilised before injection in the skin tissues. To do so, a special technical process, called “cross-linking”, will be used to bind HA molecules together and obtain as a result a cohesive HA gel with a skin smoothing, lifting and/or volumising effect that will last for several months. The duration of the treatment is very individual and depends on many factors, such as the patient’s skin type and structure, age, lifestyle, the area treated and the injection technique used by practitioner.

AN INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY

THE PATENTED IPN-LIKE TECHNOLOGY

VIVACY has developed a unique technology of hyaluronic acid cross-linking, the “IPN-Like Technology” (InterPenetrated Networks), which allows to accurately define each product’s viscoelastic properties4.

Clinically, the main product characteristics sought by the physicians are the ability to lift the skin tissues, to provide mechanical support and to spread easily. To obtain these properties, the HA gel must have a unique combination between the elasticity and the viscosity5.

These specific viscoelastic properties determine the injection plan of the gel and allow it to respond to the various mechanical stresses to which it will be subjected in the tissues after injection.

As a result, the interpenetration of HA cross-linked networks4:

  •  Optimises the products’ rheology, in particular the viscosity to guarantee a good product injectability.
  • Preserves the partial independence of the interpenetrated HA networks, whilst increasing the density of chemical nodes.
  • Guarantees the cohesion of the HA gel and its monophasic properties.

MANNITOL AND SORBITOL, ANTIOXIDANTS AGENTS

During an intradermal injection, the invasive movement of the needle through the skin’s layers provokes an inflammatory response and the production of free radicals. These free radicals are harmful for hyaluronic acid molecules and will participate in their degradation3. Consequently, the filler injected will break down quickly and the correction effect might not last as long as desired.

In order to protect the HA gel’s formulation during the injection, VIVACY has incorporated antioxidants in its injectable products: Mannitol or Sorbitol. These antioxidant agents act as effective scavengers6 of the most aggressive hydroxyl radicals generated during the injection process. As a consequence, they tend to minimize the rapid break down of the injected hyaluronic acid gel7,8.

1- Papakonstantinou, E. & Al. Hyaluronic acid - A key molecule in skin aging. Dermato-Endocrinology 4:3, 253–258; July–December 2012.
2- Ulf Anderegg, J. C. S. & Al. More than just a filler – the role of hyaluronan for skin homeostasis. Experimental Dermatology, 2014, 23, 295–303.
3- Becker, L. C. & Al. “Final Report of the Safety Assessment of Hyaluronic Acid, Potassium Hyaluronate, and Sodium Hyaluronate” International Journal of Toxicology, 2009, volume 28 Number 4S, 5-67.
4- IPN-Like Technology Patent delivered WO2009/071697 in 2008.
5- Sundaram, H. & Al., “Biophysical characteristics of hyaluronic acid soft-tissue fillers and their relevance to aesthetic applications”. American Society of Plastic Surgeons, Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 132: 5S, 2013.
6- Smirnoff, N., Cumbes, Q. J. “Hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of compatible solutes”. Journal of Phytochemistry, Vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 1057-1060, 1989.
7- Mendoza G & Al. “Inhibitory effects of different antioxidants on hyaluronan depolymerisation” Carbohydr Res. 2007 Jan 15;342(1):96-102.
8- Mongkhon, J.-M. & Al. “Sorbitol-modified hyaluronic acid reduces oxidative stress, apoptosis and mediators of inflammation and catabolism in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes”. Inflamm. Res., 2014.

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